Literature

Literature contains many genres designed, in whole or in part, as entertainment. Comics and cartoons, for example, are literary types that use drawings, usually in combination with text, to convey an entertaining narrative.[30] Comics often have elements of fantasy. Some comics are produced by companies that are part of the entertainment industry. Others have unique authors who offer a more personal, philosophical view of the world and the problems people face. Comics about superheroes such as Superman are of the first type.[31] Examples of the second sort include the individual work over 50 years of Charles M. Schultz who produced a popular comic called Peanuts about the relationships among a cast of child characters;[32] and Michael Leunig who entertains by producing whimsical cartoons that also incorporate social criticism. The Japanese Manga style differs from the western approach in that it encompasses a wide range of genres and themes for a readership of all ages. Caricature uses a kind of graphic entertainment for purposes ranging from merely putting a smile on the viewer's face, to raising social awareness, to highlighting the moral characteristics of a person being caricatured. Limericks use verse in a strict, predictable rhyme and rhythm to create humour and to amuse an audience of listeners. Interactive books such as "choose your own adventure" can make literary entertainment more participatory. Peanuts is a syndicated daily and Sunday American comic strip written and illustrated by Charles M. Schulz, which ran from October 2, 1950, to February 13, 2000, continuing in reruns afterward. The strip is the most popular and influential in the history of the comic strip, with 17,897 strips published in all,[1] making it "arguably the longest story ever told by one human being", according to Robert Thompson of Syracuse University. At its peak, Peanuts ran in over 2,600 newspapers, with a readership of 355 million in 75 countries, and was translated into 21 languages.[2] It helped to cement the four-panel gag strip as the standard in the United States,[3] and together with its merchandise earned Schulz more than $1 billion.[1] Reprints of the strip are still syndicated and run in almost every U.S. newspaper. Peanuts achieved considerable success with its television specials, several of which, including A Charlie Brown Christmas[4] and It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown,[5] won or were nominated for Emmy Awards. The holiday specials remain popular and are currently broadcast on ABC in the United States during the corresponding seasons. The Peanuts franchise met acclaim in theatre with the stage musical You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown being a successful and often-performed production. Peanuts has been described as "the most shining example of the American success story in the comic strip field"; this is ironic, given its theme is "the great American unsuccess story." The main character, Charlie Brown, is meek, nervous and lacks self-confidence. He is unable to fly a kite, win a baseball game or kick a football.[6]